Tag Archives: Bleeding gums

Can Tooth Whitening Products Cause Gum Bleeding?

Yes

Gum inflammation and irritation can result from whitening products and produce gum bleedingwhitening.

Stumpf Dental
(262) 970-0111 | www.bestcareinthechair.com
N28 W23000 Roundy Drive
Pewaukee, WI 53072

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What’s Your Excuse?

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Here are some of the Most Common Excuses to Not Visiting the Dentist

At Stumpf Dental, we cannot even tell you how many times we’ve heard people say things like…“I’ve been meaning to make an appointment but I just haven’t gotten around to it.”

With that in mind, here are some of the most frequent excuses people have for not visiting the dentist.

  • Going to the dentist is too expensive!

Actually, the opposite is true! While quality health care certainly can be costly, the investment in preventive dental procedures such as cleanings, exams and necessary x-rays can save thousands, if not tens of thousands of dollars in more extensive treatment later. The sooner you go, the less it will cost!

  • Dental appointments are uncomfortable

While a dental visit may not be as much fun as a night at the movies, it’s not as difficult as it was decades ago. Modern anesthetics and dental techniques have made a trip to the dentist more pleasant than ever before. Express your concerns to your dentist and chances are she or he will have a solution. If you don’t think your dental team is doing all they can for your comfort, it may be time to find one who does!

  • I’m not in any pain so I don’t need to go!

Even if you take fantastic care of your teeth and gums, waiting until you have pain means you waited too long! Early cavities and gum disease are painless. Waiting for symptoms can lead to complicated expensive treatment and even tooth loss!

Stumpf  Dental Values Quality Dental Care

At Stumpf Dental, we value the importance of regular dental examinations and preventive cleanings. Our goal is to make your dental treatment as comfortable and cost-efficient as possible, and to help you keep your teeth for a lifetime.

If you have any questions, concerns, or would like to make an appointment, please give us a call at 1-262-970-0111. We’re here for you!

And If you aren’t making any excuses, please feel free to forward this to someone who is. You’ll be doing them a huge favor!!

Stumpf Dental
(262) 970-0111 | www.bestcareinthechair.com
N28 W23000 Roundy Drive
Pewaukee, WI 53072

I Have a Dead Tooth, What are My Options?

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Only Two Options for a Dead Tooth

I assume you mean the nerve in the tooth is dead. To keep the tooth requires a root canal and crown. Your other option is to remove the tooth. Now you have a space and that too can be costly to fix. There are no other options. A dead tooth is a future toothache if left untreated. Don’t wait.

Root Canal and Its Causes

Root canals are necessary when a cavity that has been left untreated becomes larger. Once the cavity reaches the pulp of the tooth, an infection forms at the base of the root canal, causing an abscess. This abscess is generally painful and will need to be removed.

The doctors at Stumpf Dental know that serious tooth decay can often lead to a root canal. A root canal may be needed if the decay has reached the tooth’s nerve. Essentially, a root canal involves cleaning out a tooth’s infected root, then filling and sealing the canal.

Root Canal Procedure:
1) An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
2) The pulp is removed, and the root canals are cleaned, enlarged and shaped.
3) The infected area is medicated.
4) The root canals are filled.
5) The crown opening is filled with a temporary.

See video for root canal procedure:

Crown Procedure

 A crown is sometimes termed a “cap” or “jacket.” A crown will restore a large filling or a cracked tooth to its original size, shape and tooth color. A crown may be recommended after root canal therapy has been completed, as the tooth tends to become brittle and is more likely to fracture. A crown can strengthen and protect the remaining tooth structure and improves the appearance of your teeth. With the advances in technology we now have the ability to make ceramic crowns with no metal.

Crown Placement

To place a crown, your dentist must reduce 1-2 mm of the tooth to make room for it. Your dentist will then use a piece of thread or cord or use a laser to push the gum down around the tooth, to take an impression of the tooth. The impressions are sent to the lab where the crown is made. During that time, you will have a temporary crown. These crowns are usually made of plastic and are made in your dentist’s office on the day of your visit. They are not meant to last. If a temporary crown is left in the mouth, the cement eventually washes out, and the tooth can decay.

At a second visit, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and test the permanent one. Sometimes crowns need additional polishing, or glaze or some other adjustment before they are placed. Once the crown is ready, it’s cemented to your tooth.

Watch the video to view the crown procedure:

Stumpf Dental
(262) 970-0111 | www.bestcareinthechair.com
N28 W23000 Roundy Drive
Pewaukee, WI 53072