I Have a Dead Tooth, What are My Options?

PhotoSpin Women Portraits © 2001 PhotoSpin www.photospin.com

Only Two Options for a Dead Tooth

I assume you mean the nerve in the tooth is dead. To keep the tooth requires a root canal and crown. Your other option is to remove the tooth. Now you have a space and that too can be costly to fix. There are no other options. A dead tooth is a future toothache if left untreated. Don’t wait.

Root Canal and Its Causes

Root canals are necessary when a cavity that has been left untreated becomes larger. Once the cavity reaches the pulp of the tooth, an infection forms at the base of the root canal, causing an abscess. This abscess is generally painful and will need to be removed.

The doctors at Stumpf Dental know that serious tooth decay can often lead to a root canal. A root canal may be needed if the decay has reached the tooth’s nerve. Essentially, a root canal involves cleaning out a tooth’s infected root, then filling and sealing the canal.

Root Canal Procedure:
1) An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
2) The pulp is removed, and the root canals are cleaned, enlarged and shaped.
3) The infected area is medicated.
4) The root canals are filled.
5) The crown opening is filled with a temporary.

See video for root canal procedure:

Crown Procedure

 A crown is sometimes termed a “cap” or “jacket.” A crown will restore a large filling or a cracked tooth to its original size, shape and tooth color. A crown may be recommended after root canal therapy has been completed, as the tooth tends to become brittle and is more likely to fracture. A crown can strengthen and protect the remaining tooth structure and improves the appearance of your teeth. With the advances in technology we now have the ability to make ceramic crowns with no metal.

Crown Placement

To place a crown, your dentist must reduce 1-2 mm of the tooth to make room for it. Your dentist will then use a piece of thread or cord or use a laser to push the gum down around the tooth, to take an impression of the tooth. The impressions are sent to the lab where the crown is made. During that time, you will have a temporary crown. These crowns are usually made of plastic and are made in your dentist’s office on the day of your visit. They are not meant to last. If a temporary crown is left in the mouth, the cement eventually washes out, and the tooth can decay.

At a second visit, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and test the permanent one. Sometimes crowns need additional polishing, or glaze or some other adjustment before they are placed. Once the crown is ready, it’s cemented to your tooth.

Watch the video to view the crown procedure:

Stumpf Dental
(262) 970-0111 | www.bestcareinthechair.com
N28 W23000 Roundy Drive
Pewaukee, WI 53072

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s